Blog


Bill Gates: how much money do you need?

Bill Gates dropped out of college and by 1999 he’d made $100 billion. Now he wants to give it all away. Why is that?
‘I don’t need it. A million people a year die of malaria and yet,’ Bill says, ‘we are spending more on a drug for male baldness. That misallocation of investment is upsetting to me because I love innovation and I think it should benefit everyone.’

To read more and study this Business English module go to: Bill Gates (advanced lesson)

09/9/17

 

Viagra: hype or profit?

Viagra is one of the most counterfeited drugs in the world.  Surveys have found that high percentages of products marketed on-line as Viagra are, in fact, fake Viagra, and fake Viagra is a serious concern, because it is impossible to know exactly what it contains and what side effects it could cause…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: Viagra (advanced lesson)

02/9/17

 

DELL: how does it market the products?                                 

Dell advertisements and marketing strategies include lowering prices at all times of the year, free bonus products (such as Dell printers), and free shipping to encourage more sales and stave off competitors…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: Dell (intermediate lesson)

30/8/17

 

EBAY: everyone can be an entrepreneur 

How does eBay generate most of its revenue?The company is only successful when the buyers and sellers are successful. It is a transaction-based business that generates revenue from the sales it enables.

Threats: Consumers and merchants who use the site to sell goods also have many alternatives, including general ecommerce sites, such as Amazon and Alibaba, and more specialised sites, such as Etsy…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: eBay (elementary lesson)

24/8/17

 

STARBUCKS: everything matters, always                                

Starbucks is more than just coffee. It gets a lot of strength from the way it provides employees with a great place to work. What Starbucks does extremely well is treat employees as partners, and this feeds down into the customer satisfaction it receives. This philosophy comes from the founder, Howard Schultz, who had a difficult start to life…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: Starbucks (advanced lesson)

15/8/17

 

BRATZ vs. BARBIE: compete with a global brand                                 

The stereotype dolls’ image is Barbie; white skin, blue-eyes, blonde-hair and slim figure. However, in 2007 Bratz was the most popular children’s doll in the world. Bratz were 75% ethnic minorities and for the first time, children who were not white and did not have blue eyes saw a mainstream doll that reflected the real world. Barbie needed to catch up and fast…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: Bratz vs. Barbie (intermediate lesson)

08/8/17

 

McDONALD’S: global food                                                                   

What’s this? Shock! Horror! McDonald’s is not in the food business. It is actually in the real estate business. “The only reason we sell 25 cent hamburgers is because they are the best producer of revenue. And from this our franchisees can pay us our rent,” said former chairman Harry J Sonneborn…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: McDonald’s (elementary level)

29/7/17

 

JAY-Z: charismatic entrepreneur                                                              

It might not surprise you that Jay-Z came from a broken home and a drug dealing pas

t that led to problems with the police. His musical career also had a difficult start and despite his talent and best efforts he was rejected by all the major recording companies. This forced him to take control of his own destiny and he started Roc-A-Fella Records, his own independent label…

To read more and study this Business English module go to: Jay-Z (advanced level)

22/7/17

LLOYD’S of LONDON: can we trust tradition?                                        

When you walk into Lloyd’s of London you feel like you are walking into a street market. Noise and energy fills the air. All around you are syndicates competing for business from the brokers. And because these syndicates specialise in different types of insurance, virtually every kind of risk is covered: from natural disasters and terrorism to celebrity body parts and jewellery…

To read more and study this Business English module to: Lloyd’s of London (intermediate level)

15/7/17